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. >> af gyou've got a lot of thin here. >> gifts and everybody wants something from new york and gifts and goodies and bringing half of new york back with me. >> and packed food just in case and my husband is busy checking the bags and going through dallas, three hours there, we're fot goi are not got to cabo a 12 hour day for us. >> and a word of caution, the weather could change and may see intense storms in the midwest and unfortunately we know that may be a make it a great deal more difficult to get home after that holiday dinner, harris. >> harris: a lot of people coming back to their jobs. if you get delayed coming back in the other direction. let's take a look now if you would, david lee, about the roads this year. >> that's right, when we talk about the roads there's one crucial xocomponent is the cast of gas. it's down roughly 50 cents from september, nevertheless, it's a high for the year and triple-a though does say that the price of gasoline is not expected to make a significant impact on the number of travelers we see on the road. triple-a is now estimating there will be 8
the "new york times," this is what they write where they stand in their progress right now. and there is a disagreement about stimulus funding and whether or not that is included in some overall deal. we will talk more about this from a democrat from pennsylvania coming up here on the "washington journal" later on the program. but i want to stick to our topic here this morning. role of federal state governments and mental health. we'll go to an independent caller from pennsylvania. caller, what's your name? caller: hello? host: hi. what's your name, caller? caller: yes. the role of the government in mental health, i believe, should be stepped up and i think it's directly related to the health care industry in particular. the obama care or whatever type of health program is needed because as someone said earlier, most people do not have enough financial weather withtoll be able to assist people that they know maybe in their family or in their neighbors or the communities to help them. and i'm amazed how when we hear about an event like this, people are amazed that so much vi
. >> reporter: poppy harlow, cnn, new york. >> what a story. >>> people all over the nation are being asked to observe a moment of silence for the shooting victims tomorrow morning, once again, including on the internet. a silicon valley investor is asking websites across the country to go dark tomorrow morning at 9:30 a.m. eastern. that's exactly one week after that massacre at the elementary school. >>> other news we're following, including a powerful winter storm. it's blasting the midwest where the season's first blizzard is bringing life to a standstill and may be stranding thousands of early holiday travelers. >>> blinding snow, power outages and conditions getting worse. winter has arrived in the midwest. the blizzard is blamed for a 30-car pileup near ft. dodge, iowa. two people are dead. the storm is he cexpected to du another foot of snow in some areas before it is done. it looks like it's wet there. it's going to start snowing at tomorrow point, ted, and there will be a lot of flight cancellations at o'hare that could cause disruptions at other places as well? >> reporter: yes, w
and pennsylvania fellows and new york fellows were all good to me. >> like your colleague, daniel akaka and former transportation chairman norman, world war ii was important in the event in their lives and in your life as well. you serve in the most highly decorated unit in the history of the united states army and received a bronze star, distinguished service cross and middle of honor. can you tell us what you learned from that experience, and how did that experience impact your public career? >> well, there are certain things that haunt me even to this day. and that is the realization of that the war can change a person's character and personality. one might be content and say i'm a good person. now, for example one week before i got into the service and put on my uniform i was and sunday school teacher and i sang in acquire. my mother was a devout methodist , christian temperance movement. they don't get any more difficult than that. the whole family was that way. then after training and going overseas, i recalled telling the first german -- killing the first german. the thing that haunts me is
for us. in the spring we experienced late freezes in michigan and new york and pennsylvania that wiped out fruit crops. a lot of small family farms, farms in northern michigan wiped out. in my home state late freezes in the spring caused cherry producers to lose practically their entire crop right off the bat. it warmed up, the buds came out, then they had a deep freeze; killed everything. our growers produce 75% of the u.s. supply of cherries. that's around 270 million pounds. and the cherry producers experienced 98% loss. now in our amendment, in the disaster bill and in the farm bill, we give them some help because they spent the rest of the crop year this year having to pay to maintain the orchards and the frees, eating the costs and hoping the trees will bounce back next year and produce a crop. so they have all the costs of maintaining everything but no revenue coming in. cherry producers were also forced to fight spreading diseases like cherry leaf spot and bacterial tinker, making the trees even more costly to maintain and at risk of loss. they didn't just lose their crop this
. . mr. murphy: i yield to the gentleman from new york, mr. engel. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. engel: mr. speaker, i have been to newtown, connecticut, and it's less than an hour's drive from my congressional district. we mourn all the people who lost their lives on friday, including 20 elementary school children and six educators. over the past few years, we have seen innocent lives lost to gun violence in a supermarket parking lot in arizona, a movie theater in colorado, an army base in texas, a college campus in virginia and now an elementary school in connecticut. the weapons have spawned these tragedies and long past time that we control them. the second amendment guarantees the right to bear arms but does not guarantee an absolute right to military-style, high caliber, semi-automatic, combat-assault rifles with high capacity magazines to anybody who wants them. it just does not and must not let interest groups persuade us otherwise. we need restrictions and sensible gun control legislation. we need them here and we need them now. our children are counti
, is not on the news every night and cnn is not broadcasting from the shores of new york and new jersey -- that happened for a few days and then we've gone on to other pressing issues of the day. and as new challenges arise, the press attention will be diverted, as is natural. the problem is it may be natural but it's not necessarily good for people that have lost their homes, lost their businesses and without quick action from congress and robust, definitive, comprehensive support from the federal government, these individuals, these communities will not be able to recover. and i am living testimony as a senator from one of the state's hardest hit in recent memory from a natural disaster to really to be able to testify as almost an eyewitness -- as an eyewitness of what happened in the aftermath of hurricanes katrina and what is possible in this recovery for hurricane sandy. it's been over seven weeks since hurricane sandy claimed the lives of more than 130 americans, destroying -- and i want to correct the record -- 340,000 homes and 200,000 businesses. just to put that in comparison,
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
located at 26 east genesee street in baldwinsville, new york, as the corporal kyle schneider post office building. the speaker: without objection, when the house adjourns today it shall adjourn to meet at noon on monday, december 24, 2012, unless it sooner has received a message from the senate transmitting its concurrence in house concurrent resolution 146. in which case the house shall stand adjourned pursuant to that concurrent resolution. without objection, the house stands adjourned pursuant to that order. >> good morning. i'm president of the national rifle association of america and i'd like to welcome you here this morning for the purposes of beginning our discussion of the pop i can that's been on the minds of american parents across this country. and that is what do we do about the tragedies of the sort that struck in newtown connecticut to avoid such events in the future. like most americans, we were shocked by what happened. like all americans, we've been discussing all of the various options that are available to protect our children. and at this point we would like to share
families. >> may i inquire how much time on each side? >> 7 and 14 minutes. >> the gentleman from new york'. >> thank you. i yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from texas. >> recognized for 3 minutes. >> i thank the gentle lady and the chairman. when i mention the words hurricane sandy and the tragedy in newton, connecticut, many would wonder what do they have in common. an enormous gun tragedy and the loss of 26 lives, and americans suffering from a devastating storm. our hearts go out to those babies lost. it speaks to americans in need. that is why i am so trouble to be on the floor today. the framework we have says to america when you are in need, we will not be prepared to help you. what is disappointing, and i know for the speaker, it is probably the same case. just about three days ago, we thought there was a deal. between the white house and the framework offered. of this leadership house. it is disappointing. in the course of a couple of days, we have come to a situation where this plan, plan b, raises only about $300 billion from high income households. the centers for budget prior
of maryland. maryland was hit hard, not as hard as new jersey or new york, and our prayers go out to all the communities that have been affected. but maryland was hit pretty hard. we had sustained winds for hour after hour after hour after hour. we had rainfall records -- nine inches. we had storm surges of seven-feet waves. we had flooding on the eastern shore of maryland. we had a storm in the western part of our state that dumped -- dropped 30 inches of wet snow. so we suffered from the -- the flooding on the eastern shore and the storms in western maryland. many of the communities were people who live below poverty are elderly. senator mikulski was just on the floor and talked about the circumstances in the city of crisfield n. that city. in that city, 32% of the population live blo live below e poverty level. 71% sustained water damage. waterman, which is one of the major industries for that community, found that they were literally unable to work and they're still unclear as to what's going to happen to their crops. so we have a serious problem. give you just two examples of people
jersey or new york, they get to decide. not the appropriators, not the authorizing committee, the cor corps's going to decide. well, i can tell you one organization that has a problem with priorities in this country today is the corps of engineers. and to blanket whatever they say as a priority versus having government oversight and committee oversight and appropriator oversight, by giving this blanket waiver, what we do is we take away our powers to correct them. and all this does is say that it's not automatically authorized and we will have plenty of time. because all these are mitigation projects. they all ought to be authorized and approved by the committee of jurisdiction as they go forward. all they have to do is come to congress and say, give us approval on this. rather than a blanket approval. and i think we're setting a terrible precedent, because what it says is, in the future, then we're going to let the corps decides what is important rather than the -- corps decide what is important rather than the governors, rather than the state legislature or rather than the congress.
women's leadership academy in the harlem area of new york city, one of the first and most successful pilot projects for girls public schools with which i know the presiding officer is very familiar. and i remember the time i invited senator barbara mikulski to texas, because she and i have worked together supporting for so many years, and this year have been, she chair, and i ranking members of the appropriations subcommittee. we went to visit the johnson space center because i wanted her to see the great work they are doing there. and then i took her to the houston rodeo, because i wanted her to see the texas culture. well, i'm not sure that the senator who grew up in the inner city of baltimore knew exactly how people would dress at the rodeo, but suffice it to say, there were a lot of rhinestones and cowboy boots and big hair and big hats. senator mikulski whispered to me during this time, kay, if we were here monday and we went to the chamber of commerce, do these people look like this? and i said, yes, pretty much. so senator mikulski and i also teamed up to pass the homemaker i
as an example. so let's just understand in this body so that there's no mistake that new york and surrounding areas will get their money because the principle of fema money and probably other disaster money as well is simply this -- at the beginning of a year, you have some money in fema, but you never know what the disasters are going to be throughout the next 12 months. but when a disaster is declared, there is money there to flow, and when that disaster money runs out, as far as i know, it's always been replaced. whether you have an earthquake in california or you have a hurricane in the gulf of mexico or you have drought in the midwest like we have or texas like we have or you have tornadoes like we have in the midwest, and sandy as the most recent example. as far as i know, there has never been any dispute under the laws at that time, and those laws don't change very often. they -- they do get the money out to the people that need it, and then when that fund goes dry, it is replenished by congress. now, unless somebody is seeking money other -- in some way other than other disasters that
position and yield to the gentleman from new york whose community is suffering and who has done an able job in helping manage this bill. the presiding officer: the senator from new york. mr. schumer: first, i want to thank my colleague from pennsylvania. he didn't try to knock out the whole thing, and we appreciate that. having said that, i would just urge any of my colleagues in disaster areas to think very carefully before they vote for this. this will be the first time ever when a disaster isn't declared that we have offset money for it. that will mean that disaster money will be much less ready available in the future. the precedent is an awful one. it is something that goes against 100 years of democrats, republicans, north, east, south and west voting when one area has trouble to send the money without spending months and months and months fighting about whether to cut this or cut that or raise these taxes or do this to offset it. and i would say we had this fight when irene came about, and 19 of our colleagues came to the wisdom that it was a bad idea to offset it, and we didn't. so
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15

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